Owning the “platform”

During yesterday’s post, I had to confirm whether the Warwick Cheese Shoppe and a similarly named restaurant in Williamsburg were in fact a local chain or two similarly named businesses in the same region, with an eerily similar menus.

In searching the Facebook pages of both of these restaurants ranked high in the search results. The thing that was interesting is how much more frequently updated the Facebook pages are as compared to their web sites. Sure there is an ease of use, but the implications left me wondering.

Yesterday, Marco wrote about Medium with respect to writers, but the point is still relevant:

You can use someone else’s software, but still have your own ’platform”, if you’re hosting it from a domain name you control and are able to easily take your content and traffic with you to another tool or host at any time. You don’t need to go full-Stallman and build your own blogging engine from scratch on a Linux box in your closet — a Tumblr or Squarespace blog is perfectly fine if you use your own domain name and can export your data easily.

I find it shocking to watch TV and see major corporations use “facebook.com/”. Why do companies give away their identity to other companies like Facebook? They can’t control how they are found, they can’t control who they appear next to. This makes no sense.